Westchester

   
   

New York

       
Thursday, July 27, 2000
The Journal News
3B

Frank Becerra Jr./The Journal News
News Putnam County Highway Commissioner Harold Gary says that it will take two years to survey, design, hold pubfic hearings, acquire property and begin rebuilding this curve along Fair Street in Carmel.
Pylons help keep dangerous S-curve safe.
Putnam using the measure along Fair Street until road is widened, flattened KEN RITTER The Journal News CARMEL - After just two weeks, dents already show on flexible yellow reflectors installed along the swerving double-yellow line of Fair Street's treacherous S-curve. "People are clipping them, but not one Another," Putnam County Highway commissioner Harold Gary said yesterday of the center-line pylons installed as a stopgap measure until the road is widened, flattened and straightened in 2002. "It looks like it's working," Gary said, adding that he got two letters recently lauding the idea. Installation by county highway workers cost less than $1,500. "We've tried the (flashing warning)"We've tried the (flashing warning) lights, reflectors and edge markers. We'll do whatever we can to keep it as safe as we can until we get the road designed and rebuilt.,,
"We've tried the (flashing warning) lights, reflectors and edge markers. We'll do whatever we can to keep it as safe as we can until we get the road designed and rebuilt.,,
Harold Gary
Putnam County
Highway commissioner
lights, reflectors and edge markers," he said. "We'll do whatever we can to keep it as safe as we can until we get the road designed and rebuilt"' Last month, Gary said it would take two years to survey, design, hold public hearings, acquire property and begin rebuilding the curve, which funnels more than 6,700 vehicles a day into the heart of the Carmel hamlet. Two years ago, Putnam County announced that $6 million in federal, state and county money was available, for the job. The road is little different from when it was first built in the 1930s. It provides a key path to the seat of county government for residents of Kent, Patterson, Southeast and Carmel. Although there were 104 crashes on 'the curve between Vink Drive and DeColores and Glenna Drives from 1990 to 1997, the latest figures available, no one has been lolled, according to the Putnam County Sheriffs Office. Gary said the curving row of pylons serves as a stark reminder for motorists to slow down. "It forces people to mentally get to thinking and keep more alert," he said. "It's not going to eliminate the accidents, but if it cuts them down, it will help a lot."